5 Phrases To Stop Using In Your Email Marketing

In a world where a person is advertised to on average 300 times a day, there’s no wonder people are sick of seeing the same marketing messages.

Even across entirely different industries and niches, far too many businesses use a lot of the same phrases and words in all of their marketing. And their email marketing is no different.

There are two major problems with using similar messages to others;

Firstly, you obviously sound like everybody else. Your email just appears in a list of all others, with nothing that makes yours stand out. You’re just another advertiser, and one that most people will never buy from as long as you remain like the others.

And secondly, people change. Peoples preferences for what appeals/attracts them when they’re being advertised to are ever changing — what marketing may work this year might not the next. And one sure fire way of ensuring you never keep up with the changing preferences is basing your marketing on other businesses. That is because far too many businesses either don’t recognise the changes or underestimate them.

It’s crazy how much of a drop in sales a business must take before it stops and realises it might need to up it’s game and adapt. We’ve seen countless huge businesses fall apart in the last decade because they failed to stay ahead of changing needs and preferences — think of Blockbuster who didn’t adapt, but Netflix did and now look when they both are!

5 phrases you need to stop using NOW

Before I reveal the 5 phrases you need top stop using right now, let’s go over some of the other impacts of using these. We’ve already established that you’ll just appear as one of many other advertisers and won’t stand out. And we’ve also established that you’re less adaptable to changing preferences too.

But what are the other impacts of not stopping using the 5 phrases I’m about to reveal?

You’ll seem spammy because you’re using common words and phrases!

You appear pushy — often asking too much, too soon of people on your email list.

And you’ll be perceived as being damn too desperate — that’s right!

With that said, if you recognise any of these phrases as being used in your own email marketing, take immediate action to remove and replace them.

1. I Hope You Don’t Mind…

There is no need to be overly polite and courteous in your email marketing. Remember, your email will just be one among dozens received that day. If you’re going to stand a chance of standing out and not just being deleted, you need to quickly provoke them — say something that will make them stop and think. You’re always going to get unsubscribes and replies from less than friendly people, regardless of how polite you are. So focus instead of appealing to those that may be interested.

2. Would You Be The Correct Person?

For emails that are typically generic and not targeting the right person, this question is often used. But it just looks absolutely lazy, and that’s because it is. Don’t send an email to somebody at a company you want to work with, hoping they’ll refer you in the right direction. Instead, take a bit of time to do your research and find the name and email of the person you really want to speak to. It’s not difficult — many businesses have a meet the team page on their website. If that fails, Linkedin is your friend.

If all that fails, and you really don’t know who your email should go to, frame your email in such a way that even somebody who is completely irrelevant to what you can offer and help with reads it, they’ll naturally forward it to the right person because it seems like a great opportunity.

3. As You Probably Know…

I’ll keep this one short. Prefacing what you’re about to say is a waste of time and a waste of words. Just say what you want to say. Again, you’re competing against so many other advertising emails that day, all you’re doing by having a phrase like this at the start is making your email that much more likely to be ignored/deleted.

Get to the point!

4-5 I Would Love To / I Look Forward To

The last two are very similar — remember my point earlier about appearing desperate? Yep, that’s what phrases like these do. And again they’re overly polite and not to the point. Plus you’re pointing out the obvious — they know you would love to hear back from them. They know you look forward to hopefully speaking to them. They know, so stop telling them!

Be Odd

The main takeaway from this is simple — be odd, be different. Send emails no other business would. Don’t be overly polite, and don’t stall getting to the point. If you start thinking this way, you’ll notice other phrases and words you use in your email marketing that you should stop using. The 5 listed are just the most common I’ve come across.

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