What Makes A Winning Call To Action (CTA)?

Call To Actions or CTA’s are an increasingly common part of any marketing and advertising. You can usually find a CTA at the end of any marketing.

For example on a webinar, the presenter usually gives away some valuable information, acknowledges problems the viewers have and then offers a solution — after going in depth with the solution, they give a CTA to get people to buy it.

It’s the last step to getting somebody to take action — so it’s not necessarily about a person buying something from it — hence why it’s called a call to ACTION.

The action is significant because a person taking it means they’re very interested in what you have to say or offer them in the future, as well as identifying themselves as your ideal target audience.

So with CTAs being so vital, it’s incredibly important to get them right — so you get the maximum results (maximum actions) taken from them. In other words, a higher conversation rate.

I believe there are a total of 3 different parts that make up a winning CTA — and a failure to do all 3 will lead to poor results. If you’re going to make a CTA, make sure to get it right!

Here’s the 3 parts to making a winning CTA;

Call to Action

1. Clear

Firstly, the CTA needs to be clear. What I mean by that is the action you want them to take, must be clearly laid out in front of them. They need to be fully aware of the step or steps they need to take, and precisely what is expected of them.

Now for a lot of CTAs, the action steps are fairly short and straight forward — but it’s important to make sure you clearly lay them out regardless. For example — if the action they had to take was register for a webinar, the steps might be;

-Click on this link

-Submit your details

-Turn up at X date and Y time

Straight forward and to the point — that way it reduces any chance of confusion or mistakes, leading to less taking the actual action.

2. What If

What if the person doesn’t take the action? That’s a question you need to answer for them, and make it really clear why it’s bad for them not to.

By the point of making the CTA, you will have already covered the problems they have, and presented the solution ie the CTA. However it’s important to summarise and highlight the what ifs one last time.

This will really help reduce the doubt in peoples mind — sure you’re never going to get 100% conversation/CTA rate, probably not even close. But you’ll sure get a higher one like this.

Here’s an example;

If the problem people have is they don’t know the best investment for their hard earned savings. Your CTA — inviting them to a webinar, will mean they will leave the webinar knowing what exactly to do.

BUT, if they don’t take that CTA, they won’t know how to invest their savings. Which means they may end up making uninformed decisions, investing money in the wrong places — and losing it all!

3. Limits

Lastly, there has to be a limit to your CTA. Something that identifies that it’s a restricted opportunity that they have to take now. Examples of this include;

  • A time limit they can sign up to a webinar — maybe in the next 24 hours
  • A limited number of spaces on the webinar — so the sooner they register the better their chances of having a space
  • A one time only webinar or event or opportunity of this kind
  • Or a limit in terms of a product or service — maybe you only have 5 spaces for new clients, or 10 physical products left.

The key is to create urgency in people. At this point they know what actions they need to take, and what could happen if they don’t. But for a lot of people, that isn’t enough. They feel like they have all the time in the world to take the action.

So make it clear they don’t have all the time in the world — and if they don’t take the action sooner, rather than later, they risk the “what ifs” happening.

There you have it — the 3 steps to creating a winning Call to Action. Being really clear on the actions, summarising what could happen if people don’t take those actions AND creating urgency generates very high rates of action in audiences of all kinds.

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