Momentum must first be built before many people invest in your course…

You’ve already come so far. You’ve taken your knowledge and experience on certain subjects, assembled a course layout, recorded it all and hosted it on a great membership site.

Surely the hard work is over? Sadly, probably not. Even if you’re a well known educator who have done courses or other educational products (books, events, etc), it’s still difficult to sell something new. Sure an existing brand will help, but anything new is difficult to sell at first.

So what is the best way of selling the new course you’ve put so much into? There’s a few different ways that many best selling course creators have used in the past. The key is to generate momentum. But how?

Option 1: Free + Reviews

The first option is to offer free access to the course for a limited number of people. This must be offered alongside asking for feedback and reviews once they’ve completed it. Clearly state how much you intend to charge for the course, and that as they’re getting the content for free a review if a small price to pay.

This method works well because getting reviews is key to building momentum. If nobody has done your course before, people will be hesitant to buy it because there is no proof it will help them.

With reviews in place and the freebie slots taken, it will become easier to sell the course at its price. Then continue to gather reviews and build this up so there is so much proof of how good it is that more and more will buy…

Option 2: Discount + Reviews

Option two doesn’t involve giving away free access, but does involve giving a discount. Again this will be offered with the agreement that people will give reviews and feedback.

After the discount period, you’ll have enough reviews to put in place to support the selling of your online course at full price. Again, the reviews will help to give proof that your course will deliver what it promises — building momentum and making it easier to sell.

Option 3: Sell as is + Reviews

Option three is simply selling at full price from the very start. You’ll still ask for reviews from every customer so you can add proof that your course is good. Sure, this method means you get paid fully for your course but in fact you’re likely to make less in the long term this method.

That is because without existing proof, less people will be likely to buy in the first place. This makes momentum harder to build and for you to scale sales to larger numbers which is of course where the money is to be made.

Of all the options, option 3 is the one to avoid unless you have such a strong brand and following that you’re confident you will get enough sales to build proof and momentum.

As you can see, reviews are key to building the momentum needed to sell your online course consistently. Another bonus of getting reviews and feedback is so you continually improve your content, which is to the benefit of you and your future learners!

Oh, and what if the reviews you get are negative? Unfortunately, that may happen. Don’t take it the wrong way and certainly don’t ignore it! Accept that you’re always learning, and improve your course and get more people to try it and give reviews.

Even if your reviews are 100% positive, constantly look for ways to add more value. Plus over time they’ll be more and more content you’ve learned that you can add in, plus there will likely be updates that need to be made.

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